Recipe: Peruvian pork platter

I made this platter recently when we had our good Peruvian friends Ana and Rale (and baby Arianna!) over for lunch. I decided to put to good use the amazing pasture-fed pork belly that I bought from Feather and Bone and the excellent free range grain-free morcillas (blood sausages) and chorizos I had bought at the Eveleigh farmers market.

Melanda Park morcilla and chorizo

Melanda Park morcilla and chorizo

The platter (which I actually served in 2 platters) has 4 components: morcilla with fig applesauce (or applesauce with figs), chorizo con patacones (chorizo with smashed & fried plantains), majado de yuca con chicharrón (smashed cassava with fried pork), and chicharrón con camote (fried pork with sweet potato). Feel free to use independent parts of this recipe as you please. If you choose to do the full monty, please read the entire recipe to have an idea of what needs to be done first (if you need some suggestions, leave a comment on this post).

Morcilla & fig applesauce, chorizo & patacones

Morcilla & fig applesauce, chorizo con patacones

Majado de yuca con chicharron, chicharron con camote

Majado de yuca con chicharrón, chicharrón con camote

I served the platters with salsa criolla (translates as “creole sauce” but it’s really an onion salad), which is served as a side for many (most?) Peruvian dishes. It’s smart to serve a bowl with chili and a bowl without it, for people to choose.

Salsa criolla

Salsa criolla

I also made a salad with lettuce, heirloom tomatoes, palmitos (hearts of palm), avocado and olives, dressed with lime juice and olive oil (yeah, we like our food tangy).

Salad with heirloom tomatoes, palmitos, avocado and olives

Peruvian pork platter
Yield: 6 – 8 servings

Ingredients

Morcilla and fig applesauce:

  • 2 morcillas (blood sausage)
  • 1 medium apple
  • 1 large ripe fig
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Chorizo con patacones:

  • 4 chorizos
  • 2 plantains
  • ghee or butter

Chicharrón con camote:

  • 1/2 kilo pork belly
  • 2 sweet potatoes
  • ghee or butter
  • salt

Majado de yuca con chicharrón:

  • 1/2 kilo pork belly
  • 1 kilo frozen cassava
  • 1 red onion
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon ají amarillo or other chili powder
  • salt and pepper

Salsa criolla:

  • 1 red onion
  • 4 – 5 limes
  • 2 small hot chilies (optional)
  • coriander leaves

Directions

Morcilla and fig applesauce:

  1. Chop the apples and figs and cook with a splash of water and cinnamon for 40 minutes on low heat. Puree in food processor.
  2. Slice morcillas and fry in dry pan or bake in hot oven.
  3. Serve morcilla slices with fig applesauce on the side.

Chorizo con patacones:

  1. Cut each plantain in 4 pieces. Place on baking tray lined with wax paper and bake in moderate oven until soft.
  2. With a pestle or other blunt instrument, smash plantain pieces until flattened but not mushy. Fry them in ghee or butter until golden.
  3. Slice chorizo and fry in dry pan or bake in hot oven.
  4. Serve chorizo slices on top of patacones.

Chicharrón con camote:

  1. Cut pork belly in 2-inch cubes. Place in heavy-bottomed pot, sprinkle with salt and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and cook until all the water has evaporated (this will take 2 to 3 hours). Let pieces brown in the melted fat.
  2. While the chicharrón is cooking, slice the sweet potatoes. Place them on baking tray lined with wax paper and bake in moderate oven until soft (this can be done along with the plantains).
  3. Fry the sweet potato slices in ghee or butter until golden.
  4. Serve half of the chicharrón pieces (the pretiest ones) on top of sweet potato slices and salsa criolla on the side. Reserve the rest of the chicharrón for the majado.

Majado de yuca con chicharrón:

  1. This step is the same as in the recipe above. If you’re doing both recipes, cook all the pork together and then divide it in two.
    If not… cut pork belly in 2-inch cubes. Place in heavy-bottomed pot, sprinkle with salt and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil, lower the heat and cook until all the water has evaporated (this will take 2 to 3 hours). Let pieces brown in the melted fat.
  2. While the chicharrón is cooking, boil the cassava until soft (20 – 30 minutes). Remove the hard filament from the middle of each piece and mash in a bowl using a pestle or a similar blunt instrument.
  3. Finely chop the onion and mince the garlic.
  4. In a large pan, heat some of the fat from the chicharrón. Cook the onion, garlic and chili at low heat for 10 minutes.
  5. Add mashed cassava and the rest of the chicharrón.
  6. Season with salt and pepper, mix well and heat through.
  7. Serve it “traditional-style” (just chuck it on the plate) or use a ring to make a cylinder or two big serving spoons to make a quenelle (fancy word for a rugby ball shape), like I did.

Salsa criolla:

  1. Finely slice the onion.
  2. Optional but recommended: soak onion in cold water for a few hours, then drain in a strainer.
  3. Add lime juice, finely chopped chilies (if using) and finely chopped coriander leaves. Chill in the fridge until serving.

6 thoughts on “Recipe: Peruvian pork platter

  1. Wow wow wow! Now THIS is a platter I’d happily tuck into. Gaby, this is just heaven! I’m intrigued by the majado de yuca con chicharrón as I’ve not had cassava very often. Everything looks sensational.

    1. Thanks, John. Cassava is amazing and very versatile. Just make sure to cook it well by boiling it in water and discarding the water, otherwise it can be very toxic. After that, make majado or simply fry in butter.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s